Sloane Street Insider

FACT OF THE WEEK: HOLY TRINITY, TEMPLE OF THE ARTS & CRAFTS MOVEMENT

The Holy Trinity church on Sloane Street, near Sloane Square, was built in 1888 by John Dando Sedding, an architect inspired by the Arts and Crafts movement, which itself was a creative reaction to the mass industrialization that was sweeping the globe. The church was built at the cost of the 5th Earl Cadogan, in whose London estate it laid. It replaced an earlier church only half its size which, at the time of its demolition, was less than 60 years old.

Truthfully, it is one of the prettiest churches in London. 

It contains works by William Morris, Edward Burne-Jones, Christopher Whall, and the biggest attraction is the beautiful stained glass windows made by William Morris & Co., Sir William Blake Richmond and Whall. These are the windows that inspired the poet John Betjeman to describe the church as “the cathedral of the Arts and Crafts Movement.”

Holy Trinity is a huge building, with a nave nine inches wider than that of St Pauls Cathedral. Despite the elaborate furnishings designed by the leading sculptors and designers of the day, including F.W. Pomeroy, H.H. Armstead, Onslow Ford and Hamo Thornycroft, Holy Trinity has a serene interior, an effect reinforced by the many unfinished statues within the church, and to the fact that a grand frieze below the clerestory windows was never attempted.

The architect, Sedding, was also a keen organist, so he took great care in designing the huge organ chamber, which is more than 40ft high. Church services on Sunday morning often include music, and there are regular concerts held at the church.

As well as being a member of the Church of England in the Diocese of London and the worldwide Anglican Communion, Holy Trinity is open all day and every day for everyone of whatever religion, or even none at all.

Holy Trinity Church, Sloane St, London SW1X 9BZ

 

Uncategorized

FACT OF THE WEEK: HOLY TRINITY, TEMPLE OF THE ARTS & CRAFTS MOVEMENT

Uncategorized

FACT OF THE WEEK: HOLY TRINITY, TEMPLE OF THE ARTS & CRAFTS MOVEMENT

The Holy Trinity church on Sloane Street, near Sloane Square, was built in 1888 by John Dando Sedding, an architect inspired by the Arts and Crafts movement, which itself was a creative reaction to the mass industrialization that was sweeping the globe. The church was built at the cost of the 5th Earl Cadogan, in whose London estate it laid. It replaced an earlier church only half its size which, at the time of its demolition, was less than 60 years old.

Truthfully, it is one of the prettiest churches in London. 

It contains works by William Morris, Edward Burne-Jones, Christopher Whall, and the biggest attraction is the beautiful stained glass windows made by William Morris & Co., Sir William Blake Richmond and Whall. These are the windows that inspired the poet John Betjeman to describe the church as “the cathedral of the Arts and Crafts Movement.”

Holy Trinity is a huge building, with a nave nine inches wider than that of St Pauls Cathedral. Despite the elaborate furnishings designed by the leading sculptors and designers of the day, including F.W. Pomeroy, H.H. Armstead, Onslow Ford and Hamo Thornycroft, Holy Trinity has a serene interior, an effect reinforced by the many unfinished statues within the church, and to the fact that a grand frieze below the clerestory windows was never attempted.

The architect, Sedding, was also a keen organist, so he took great care in designing the huge organ chamber, which is more than 40ft high. Church services on Sunday morning often include music, and there are regular concerts held at the church.

As well as being a member of the Church of England in the Diocese of London and the worldwide Anglican Communion, Holy Trinity is open all day and every day for everyone of whatever religion, or even none at all.

Holy Trinity Church, Sloane St, London SW1X 9BZ