Sloane Street Insider

Valentino Haute Couture

Valentino 7

Valentino creative directors Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli presented their “Mirabilia Romae” at the sixteenth-century Palazzo Mignanelli, the place where the designers, and their seamstresses go to work every day.

A vast wooden podium was erected to act as the runway that transported models channelling pagan handmaidens, Renaissance princesses, daughters of the modern-day nobility and saintly princesses in front of press and the maison’s most dedicated clients. It was like an ode to all the women who have trod the streets of Rome throughout the centuries.

It was a romantic collection, played out in exquisite detail and in a mostly black palette, with highlights of gold and the trademark Valentino scarlet. Every look, whether in floor-sweeping lace or tulle, or rich rad velvet, was worn with flat Roam sandals that laced up the leg and was accessorised with gold jewellery, slim metal belts and filigree diadems.

There were nods to the gladiators in shapes reminiscent of their armour seen in a stunning gold leather jewelled dress, and luscious volumes spoke of the robes of priests and cardinals from the Vatican City.

Earlier in the day, the audience had been treated to a tour of the Rome that illustrated the designers’ inspirations: churches, palaces, a 16th Century library, a fencing school, the set department of the opera house, finishing at an exhibition of pieces from the Valentino archives.

Here are a few of our favourite looks from the show.

Valentino 8 Valentino 9

Valentino 6 Valentino 2

Valentino 3 Valentino 4

Uncategorized

Valentino Haute Couture

Valentino 7

Valentino creative directors Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli presented their “Mirabilia Romae” at the sixteenth-century Palazzo Mignanelli, the place where the designers, and their seamstresses go to work every day.

A vast wooden podium was erected to act as the runway that transported models channelling pagan handmaidens, Renaissance princesses, daughters of the modern-day nobility and saintly princesses in front of press and the maison’s most dedicated clients. It was like an ode to all the women who have trod the streets of Rome throughout the centuries.

It was a romantic collection, played out in exquisite detail and in a mostly black palette, with highlights of gold and the trademark Valentino scarlet. Every look, whether in floor-sweeping lace or tulle, or rich rad velvet, was worn with flat Roam sandals that laced up the leg and was accessorised with gold jewellery, slim metal belts and filigree diadems.

There were nods to the gladiators in shapes reminiscent of their armour seen in a stunning gold leather jewelled dress, and luscious volumes spoke of the robes of priests and cardinals from the Vatican City.

Earlier in the day, the audience had been treated to a tour of the Rome that illustrated the designers’ inspirations: churches, palaces, a 16th Century library, a fencing school, the set department of the opera house, finishing at an exhibition of pieces from the Valentino archives.

Here are a few of our favourite looks from the show.

Valentino 8 Valentino 9

Valentino 6 Valentino 2

Valentino 3 Valentino 4

Uncategorized

Valentino Haute Couture

Valentino 7

Valentino creative directors Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli presented their “Mirabilia Romae” at the sixteenth-century Palazzo Mignanelli, the place where the designers, and their seamstresses go to work every day.

A vast wooden podium was erected to act as the runway that transported models channelling pagan handmaidens, Renaissance princesses, daughters of the modern-day nobility and saintly princesses in front of press and the maison’s most dedicated clients. It was like an ode to all the women who have trod the streets of Rome throughout the centuries.

It was a romantic collection, played out in exquisite detail and in a mostly black palette, with highlights of gold and the trademark Valentino scarlet. Every look, whether in floor-sweeping lace or tulle, or rich rad velvet, was worn with flat Roam sandals that laced up the leg and was accessorised with gold jewellery, slim metal belts and filigree diadems.

There were nods to the gladiators in shapes reminiscent of their armour seen in a stunning gold leather jewelled dress, and luscious volumes spoke of the robes of priests and cardinals from the Vatican City.

Earlier in the day, the audience had been treated to a tour of the Rome that illustrated the designers’ inspirations: churches, palaces, a 16th Century library, a fencing school, the set department of the opera house, finishing at an exhibition of pieces from the Valentino archives.

Here are a few of our favourite looks from the show.

Valentino 8 Valentino 9

Valentino 6 Valentino 2

Valentino 3 Valentino 4